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home : reviews : Visiontek GeForce4 Ti4400/4600 Review




Benjamin Sun
May 28, 2002

Visiontek GeForce4 Ti4400/4600
The number one video card retailer gives gamers knock-out performance!

Vision Technology. Every six months or so, on a fairly regular basis, NVIDIA releases a new high-end videocard replacing their current card with the new card. Usually, they do a new architecture every 12-18 months with one or two refresh parts in between. This year, NVIDIA decided to launch a retooling of their entire graphics card lineup, instead of releasing one card per six months as usual. They launched two new graphics chips, the GeForce4 MX (NV17) and GeForce4 Titanium (NV25), with 6 variations of the cards total.

The GeForce4 Titanium is the card I'm looking at in this review. Specifically the Ti4400 and Ti4600 variants of the card. from Visiontek. NVIDIA's 3 cards in the GeForce4 Titanium series are the Ti4600 with 128MB of Ram and a core/memory speed of 300/325 (Note: I never double DDR memory bandwith) with a MSRP of $399, a Ti4400 with 128MB of Ram and a 275/275 core/memory clockspeed and a MSRP of $299 and two versions of the GeForce4 Ti4200, one with 64MB and a clockspeed of 250/250 and an MSRP of $179 and a 128MB version with a clockspeed of 250/222 and an MSRP of $199.

The Ti4400 fits neatly into the middle range of price points of the Titanium series. I consider this pricepoint to be a gamer's price point, $100 less than the top-end and competing directly against the top end of the competition, the 128MB 8500. If you look carefully, you can find the Ti4400 for around $250 online - which should fit most high-end gamer's budgets.

The Ti4600, of course is NVIDIA’s flagship video card. For a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price of $399, it’s meant for the real high-end gamer - those that want no-compromise performance, regardless of the price. While it's a fine card, all the gameplay experiences will be done with the Ti4400 in this review. The Ti4600 would be able to play at those resolutions in the game and more. To illustrate the performance difference I'll do an extensive set of benchmarks with the Ti4400/4600.

Visiontek, as a company came into existence in 1988. Founded by three friends in Chicago Illinois, it can only be considered a rags to riches story for them. First gaining prominence as a maker of memory modules, Visiontek has expanded into other arenas including videocards. For most of their history as a videocard manufacturer, Visiontek has been mainly a OEM supplier for videocards for NVIDIA based chips to such companies as Dell, Compaq, Gateway and others.

Last year, Visiontek entered into the retail video card market with their Xtasy line of video cards. Setting a goal of being the number one seller of retail video cards in the US, Visiontek entered the retail market with a vengeance. Late year, Visiontek took over the number one spot for retail graphics boards in the US - a position they still hold today (according to NPD Intellect, a firm that tracks retail sales of many items in the US marketplace). With the launch of the GeForce4 Titanium series, it's likely they will be the number one seller of video cards for 2002. It's an amazing feat considering they only entered the retail market last year.
VisionTek Logo
VisionTek, Inc.
Founded in 1988, VisionTek, Inc. is a company that focuses in two markets. Agilitas, a division of VisionTek, Inc., is a technology design and manufacturing services provider (TDMS). VisionTek, a consumer division, creates products such as graphics cards, memory, and fire wire technology.




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